Advertise | Bookmark | Contact Us | E-Mail List |  | Update Page | UraniumSeek.com 

Commentary : Gold Review : Markets : News Wire : Quotes : Silver : Stocks - Main Page 

 GoldSeek.com >> News >> Story  Disclaimer 
 
Latest Headlines

GoldSeek Radio Nugget: Charles Hughes Smith and Chris Waltzek
By: radio.GoldSeek.com

What Gold Needs to Do Now
By: Rick Ackerman

Asian Metals Market Update: December-14-2017
By: Chintan Karnani, Insignia Consultants

Gold Seeker Closing Report: Gold and Silver Gain About 1% and 2%
By: Chris Mullen, Gold Seeker Report

Bitcoin Total Wipeout Alert
By: Clive Maund

Ira Epstein's Metals Video 12 13 2017
By: Ira Epstein

Hope for the day of deliverance but avoid predicting it
By: Chris Powell

The Fed is Arranging Deck Chairs on the Titanic (the Iceberg Comes in 2018).
By: Graham Summers

Out Of Money By November 29th - Social Security Indexing Part 3
By: Daniel R. Amerman, CFA

BullionStar Perspectives - Eric Sprott - The Gold Market
By: BullionStar

 
Search

GoldSeek Web

 
Japan Is First To Panic; Won’t Be The Last


By: John Rubino



 -- Published: Monday, 30 May 2016 | Print  | Disqus 

The most widely-reported result of the recent G-7 meeting was Japan’s attempt to convince the other major economies to admit that a crisis is imminent and take appropriately radical steps. The response seems to have been a bunch of blank stares. As India’s Business Standard noted:

G7 pact offers minimal cover for Abenomics reset

A Group of Seven compromise offers minimal cover for Shinzo Abe. The Japanese prime minister’s plan to revitalize the world’s third-largest economy needs fresh impetus. Abe didn’t get as much international backing as he might have liked from hosting the rich nations’ club. But, the summit communique can, just about, be spun his way.

Abe’s counterparts, understandably, do not share his view that the world risks another Lehman Brothers-style financial crisis. That is important because Abe has inexplicably committed to raising the country’s sales tax next April, a surefire way to choke off recovery – unless a shock of this scale emerges.

So Japan — which, remember, has already borrowed eye-popping amounts of money, increased its central bank balance sheet by more as a percent of GDP than have either the Fed or ECB, and pushed interest rates on most of its government bonds into negative territory, all to no avail — has decided to act on its (manifestly justified) sense of panic by starting a new round of deficit spending:

Japan’s Abe Plans Up to $90.7 Billion Stimulus, Nikkei Says

(Bloomberg) – Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to propose a fiscal stimulus package of as much as 10 trillion yen ($90.7 billion) after warning Group of Seven leaders that the global economy faces significant risk of another crisis, according to the Nikkei newspaper.

Abe will seek a second supplementary budget worth 5 trillion yen to 10 trillion yen after July’s upper-house election, the Nikkei reported Saturday without attribution. Proposals will include accelerating the construction of a magnetic-levitation train line from Nagoya to Osaka, issuing vouchers to boost consumer spending, increasing pay for child-care workers and setting up a scholarship fund, the Nikkei said.

“When you want to get the economy going, as long as demand in Asia is weak, you need additional public spending,” Martin Schulz, a senior economist at Fujitsu Research Institute in Tokyo, said by phone. “Since private spending is still not picking up, the government is simply taking up the slack.”

The stimulus package would be the second this fiscal year after Japan approved a 778 billion yen supplementary budget this month to aid recovery from earthquakes in the Kumamoto region.

And about that tax increase…

Japan Abe set to delay sales tax hike by one-three years – sources

(Reuters) – Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will postpone a sales tax hike planned for next year, perhaps by as much as three years, government sources say, a move he will justify as part of G7 efforts to avert another global financial crisis.

While the tax hike was seen as critical to reining in Japan’s massive public debt, Abe and his aides have signalled the chance of deferring it as Japan’s economy skirts recession and a threat of deflation re-emerges ahead of summer upper house elections.

“We’ve reached a global agreement to cooperate to avoid another big crisis from erupting … As G7 chair, Japan will spearhead such moves to contribute to the global economy using all policy tools available,” Abe told reporters after the Group of Seven (G7) leaders’ summit in western Japan on Friday.

“We must reignite powerfully the engine of Abenomics. That undoubtedly would include a decision on what to do with the sales tax hike,” he said, offering his strongest hint yet that next year’s tax hike will be delayed.

What does this mean? In a nutshell, the next phase of the global economic crisis has begun. First, governments responded to the 2000 tech stock crash with lower interest rates and big deficits. Then they responded to the housing/banking/derivatives bust of 2008 with even lower interest rates, bigger deficits and experiments like QE. Then they responded to the resulting anemic recovery with negative interest rates and more QE.

None of the above has produced the kind of growth in the US, Europe or Japan that slows the upward march of debt/GDP, which means everyone is still digging their own financial graves. Since this is not an acceptable long-term strategy (eventually the sides of the hole cave in and bury you), something else has to be tried by the people who hope for re-election a few years hence. So now we’re back to massive deficits, but with a negative interest rate twist. Think about it: When a government issues negative-rate debt, it earns a profit on the transaction. And when it sells its debt to its own central bank it in effect owes the money to itself. A site called Forex Live just published an interesting analysis of this unprecedented situation:

A paradigm shift is under way on deficits

If you can print your own money, you can issue unlimited amounts. The only risks are inflation and a decline in the currency.

It just so happens that inflation and a decline in the currency are exactly what many governments want.
In the developed world, inflation is non-existent and the currency war rages. The trump card in that game is default via monetization and it’s coming.

The dominant ethos of the past 25 years has been a drive towards fiscal discipline. Politicians and political commentators have built their reputations and careers as misers. There is something inherently, almost pathologically wrong about defaulting.

That will all change.

The idea of default sounds like it would create panic; if not in the streets then in markets. But it’s easier than you might assume and it will happen sooner than you think.

The hard part is already done. It’s simply a matter of taking the debt the central bank already owns and writing it off. To ease the shock value of it, the debt will simply be converted into bonds the central bank will continue to ‘own’ but will have 0% coupons and no maturity.

Japan will be the first to do it
Japan is a demographic nightmare and has been unable to stir inflation for the past 20 years despite zeroed out rates. The debt-to-GDP ratio is a mind-blowing 227.9% with a fresh stimulus budget coming. There is no way out.

At the moment, the BOJ owns 35% of Japan’s government debt and at the current pace of buying it will hit 63.3% at the end of 2020. With the stroke of a pen, all that could disappear.

I don’t even think it would be disruptive. The central bank could launch a new round of QE at the same time as the announcement and keep control of what’s left of the bond market. At the moment, Japanese 10-year are yielding -0.11%. The means you have to pay interest to the government just so they’ll give you your money back in 10 years. Almost everyone who owns Japanese bonds is an insurance company or pension fund that has no other choice.

How do markets react
Governments face hard choices but they will find that monetization is far easier than Eurozone-style austerity (how many governments won re-election after that?) or stalled out growth.

Certainly in the first episode there will be some worries in markets. Gold will undoubtedly rally and the currency will decline. It may even create some inflation.

But like QE, the first forays will be small and governments will quickly fall in love with the ability to spend in ever-larger amounts.

This is disturbing on a lot of levels, but it’s also quite conceivable. When governments figure out that in a world of deflation (caused by the industrial overcapacity and bad debt from their previous policy mistakes) they really can borrow and spend whatever they want — and if it causes inflation, well, great, they win the currency war — then the floodgates will open.

Japan, as it has with past monetary and fiscal insanities, is leading the way. And if history is any guide the rest of us will follow along shortly.


| Digg This Article
 -- Published: Monday, 30 May 2016 | E-Mail  | Print  | Source: GoldSeek.com

comments powered by Disqus







 



Increase Text SizeDecrease Text SizeE-mail Link of Current PagePrinter Friendly PageReturn to GoldSeek.com

 news.goldseek.com >> Story

E-mail Page  | Print  | Disclaimer 


© 1995 - 2017



GoldSeek.com Supports Kiva.org

© GoldSeek.com, Gold Seek LLC

The content on this site is protected by U.S. and international copyright laws and is the property of GoldSeek.com and/or the providers of the content under license. By "content" we mean any information, mode of expression, or other materials and services found on GoldSeek.com. This includes editorials, news, our writings, graphics, and any and all other features found on the site. Please contact us for any further information.

Live GoldSeek Visitor Map | Disclaimer

The views contained here may not represent the views of GoldSeek.com, its affiliates or advertisers. GoldSeek.com makes no representation, warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy or completeness of the information (including news, editorials, prices, statistics, analyses and the like) provided through its service. Any copying, reproduction and/or redistribution of any of the documents, data, content or materials contained on or within this website, without the express written consent of GoldSeek.com, is strictly prohibited. In no event shall GoldSeek.com or its affiliates be liable to any person for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided herein.