LIVE Gold Prices $  | E-Mail Subscriptions | Update GoldSeek | GoldSeek Radio 

Commentary : Gold Review : Markets : News Wire : Quotes : Silver : Stocks - Main Page 

 GoldSeek.com >> News >> Story  Disclaimer 
 
Latest Headlines

Precious Metals Update Video: Gold up as people ran into safe havens
By: Ira Epstein

COT Gold, Silver and US Dollar Index Report - March-22-2019
By: GoldSeek.com

Gold Mid-Tiers’ Q4’18 Fundamentals
By: Adam Hamilton, Zeal Research

Self-Destruction: Cheerleading the Process
By: Gary Christenson, Deviant Investor

The U.S. Economy Is In Big Trouble
By: Dave Kranzler

Gold Resource Corporation Mirador Mine Development Crosscuts 6 Meters of 992 Grams Per Tonne Silver
By: Gold Resource Corp.

Central Banks Are Messing With Your Head
By: Thorsten Polleit

A Permabear Talks Lollipops and Roses
By: Rick Ackerman, Rick's Picks

Gold …Some Confirmations to Watch For
By: Rambus

On The Hot Seat
By: Ted Butler

 
Search

GoldSeek Web

 
Trump Triumphs as Brexit Faces a Serious Threat

By: John Browne
Senior Market Strategist, Euro Pacific Capital, Inc.

 -- Published: Tuesday, 15 November 2016 | Print  | Disqus 

Brexit and the Donald Trump presidential victory should rightly be viewed as the most significant international developments of the last decade. Both events illustrate a breaking down of globalist order and they both threaten the entrenched elite that has so ruthlessly and painfully hurt the middle and working classes. But as Trump supporters revel in the largely unanticipated victory, Brexit faces a serious new challenge.

 

On November 3, 2016, The English High Court ruled that the UK's withdrawal from the EU would affect substantially the "rights of individuals within the UK." As a result, the Court concluded that despite the referendum, and the "Crown prerogative" that grants the Government considerable leeway, particularly in matters of foreign affairs, the decision to leave the EU must be made by Parliament. Given that the government has made many decisions to increase the UK's "ever-closer" integration into the EU over the years, which clearly affected the "rights of UK individuals," it is curious that the Court would finally decide to step in when the government was moving in the other direction.

 

The May Government has announced that it will appeal to the UK's Supreme Court. Some lawyers advise that should the Supreme Court overrule the High Court, the Claimants might appeal still to the European Court of Human Rights under the Human Rights Act 1998. Whether this Court would accept jurisdiction is unclear. Regardless, the current Government and the Brexit camp are shocked and angry at the High Court's ruling. They are joined by powerful sections of the UK's mass media including the Daily Mail which has labeled the High Court as being "Enemies of The People" (James Slack, 11/3/16).

 

If the Supreme Court upholds the High Court decision, it is likely that Prime Minister May will have to consult Parliament. She is unlikely to find there a receptive audience. According to Business Insider some 73 percent of the 650 Members of the House of Commons, and probably a greater percentage of Peers in the House of Lords, were and probably are still in favor of remaining in the EU (Jim Edwards, 11/3/16). This means that the members of Parliament can easily rise up and vote to restore the order that they so clearly believe should be restored. But will they be prepared to defy the will of the people? This is a tall order for every politician. They could argue that the public will has changed since the vote and that the win was not all that decisive to begin with. Such arguments will be politically perilous.

 

By 51.9 percent to 48.1 percent the British people voted for Brexit (BBC News). However, this seemingly small margin led to 61 percent of the UK's Parliamentary constituencies to vote for Brexit, according to data from the University of East Anglia. It will take very brave Conservative Members of Parliament to vote their conscious to remain, thereby defying both their party whips, who control their promotions within the Party, and the expressed will of their constituents who control their continued membership in Parliament. Even Labour members who may desperately want to remain in the EU, may be reticent to oppose the clear wishes of their voters to leave. The fractured leadership of the Labour Party may not be able to bring much pressure on wavering members to cast a "remain" vote. The remain sentiment in the House of Lords appears even stronger than in Commons. But if Prime Minister May were to add the threat of enacting further reform of the House of Lords, it might bring enough peers into line.

 

The remain case has been further weakened by the lack of post-Brexit catastrophe forecast by Cameron and his allies before the vote. Recent headlines confirm the return of optimism: the Telegraph published, "UK jobs market 'thriving' after summer pause." City AM reported "Retail sales up in best month since January." Meanwhile, financial markets appear to have stabilized.

 

Based on all this, it is hard to imagine that UK parliamentarians will stage a quixotic last minute stand to resist the independence of the UK.

 

Regardless, the EU negotiators may insist that to retain access to EU markets the UK must open its boarders to EU immigrants, largely from the Middle East. If unacceptable to the UK government, likely it will result in a so-called "Hard Brexit" whereby the UK will be expelled. Should this occur, it will not be the first time England has been expelled from most of Europe. Should this occur, Britons should rejoice as history has shown that England does well when it does not yoke herself too closely to the Continent.

 

When King Henry VIII broke with the Church of Rome, England was forced to trade worldwide. This put England into the exploration and colonization business, which proved to be quite fruitful. When Napoleon's influence spread across the Continent in the early 19th Century, Britain shut down European ports and looked to trade elsewhere. This resulted in the largest accumulation of empire in England's history, allowing the small island nation to garner wealth, political influence and military power on a global scale.

 

Under Brexit, I believe the UK will be free to trade worldwide on terms that suit the UK's economy rather than that of the 28-nation EU, which has still no effective trade treaties with the U.S., China and Japan. First Brexit and now Trump have exposed powerful popular feelings of deep resentment. An increasing number of voters feel ignored by what they perceive as self-serving, uncaring and unresponsive rulers who have created a political class that is cocooned away from the financial realities which plague normal citizens. It is not a political party but, as Trump describes, "it's a movement." Likely, it will threaten the unraveling of conventional party politics in the U.S., the UK and the EU.

 

Brexit and the U.S. election have clearly given momentum to the anti-globalist world view. Such forces are also gaining ascendency in Italy and France. However, the forces of globalization are extremely powerful and deeply entrenched. They will surely fight back. The first round will be in the UK Parliament. But no one knows where the fight will progress.

 

Read the original article at Euro Pacific Capital
| Digg This Article
 -- Published: Tuesday, 15 November 2016 | E-Mail  | Print  | Source: GoldSeek.com

comments powered by Disqus - John Browne Senior Market Strategist, Euro Pacific Capital, Inc.


John Browne is the Senior Market Strategist for Euro Pacific Capital, Inc. Working from the firm’s Boca Raton Office, Mr. Brown is a distinguished former member of Britain's Parliament who served on the Treasury Select Committee, as Chairman of the Conservative Small Business Committee, and as a close associate of then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Among his many notable assignments, John served as a principal advisor to Mrs. Thatcher's government on issues related to the Soviet Union, and was the first to convince Thatcher of the growing stature of then Agriculture Minister Mikhail Gorbachev. As a partial result of Brown's advocacy, Thatcher famously pronounced that Gorbachev was a man the West "could do business with." A graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, Britain's version of West Point and retired British army major, John served as a pilot, parachutist, and communications specialist in the elite Grenadiers of the Royal Guard.

In addition to careers in British politics and the military, John has a significant background, spanning some 37 years, in finance and business. After graduating from the Harvard Business School, John joined the New York firm of Morgan Stanley & Co as an investment banker. He has also worked with such firms as Barclays Bank and Citigroup. During his career he has served on the boards of numerous banks and international corporations, with a special interest in venture capital. He is a frequent guest on CNBC's Kudlow & Co. and the former editor of NewsMax Media's Financial Intelligence Report and Moneynews.com.




 



Increase Text SizeDecrease Text SizeE-mail Link of Current PagePrinter Friendly PageReturn to GoldSeek.com

 news.goldseek.com >> Story

E-mail Page  | Print  | Disclaimer 


© 1995 - 2019



GoldSeek.com Supports Kiva.org

© GoldSeek.com, Gold Seek LLC

The content on this site is protected by U.S. and international copyright laws and is the property of GoldSeek.com and/or the providers of the content under license. By "content" we mean any information, mode of expression, or other materials and services found on GoldSeek.com. This includes editorials, news, our writings, graphics, and any and all other features found on the site. Please contact us for any further information.

Live GoldSeek Visitor Map | Disclaimer


Map

The views contained here may not represent the views of GoldSeek.com, Gold Seek LLC, its affiliates or advertisers. GoldSeek.com, Gold Seek LLC makes no representation, warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy or completeness of the information (including news, editorials, prices, statistics, analyses and the like) provided through its service. Any copying, reproduction and/or redistribution of any of the documents, data, content or materials contained on or within this website, without the express written consent of GoldSeek.com, Gold Seek LLC, is strictly prohibited. In no event shall GoldSeek.com, Gold Seek LLC or its affiliates be liable to any person for any decision made or action taken in reliance upon the information provided herein.